The Black Horse pub, Oldfield Lane North

The Black Horse pub is next to the bridge where Oldfield Lane North crosses the Grand Union canal. Consequently its sign shows a barge being towed by a black horse. My partner found a reference to it in the proceedings of the Old Bailey, which are now available online. In 1887 Tom Collis was found guilty of assaulting his girlfriend, Rose Burnside, throwing her off the bridge following an argument they’d had after leaving the Black Horse. The establishment attracts a better behaved customer these days, favoured by cyclists, walkers and those who stop at the moorings close to it. Click here to see the website which shows it to better advantage than my photos, which were taken on a very gloomy and overcast day. Quizzes and live music are regular events here and they are already taking bookings for Christmas.

Images and text ©Albertina McNeill 2012. Please do not reproduce without permission. All rights reserved. Do not add any of these images to Pinterest or similar sites as this will be regarded as a violation of copyright.

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This entry was published on September 12, 2012 at 10:12 pm. It’s filed under Places and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

5 thoughts on “The Black Horse pub, Oldfield Lane North

  1. Ted Drawneek on said:

    And they say drunkenness is worse these days than it used to be…

    I liked the Prisoner’s Defence though: “the woman is a bad lot and always drunk.” It didn’t seem to do him much good though.

    • Did you notice that they actually got to the Black Horse via the Ballot Box?! I’m surprised they could walk! I suspect there was a lot of drinking because there was simply nothing else to do, apart from stealing livestock which seems to get many a mention in the court records – try typing in “Greenford”.

  2. The Old Bailey website is quite addictive, I have been searching for some time this morning!

    • I came across the mention of an early 18th century murderess whose accomplice came from Greenford but can’t find the website again. They were a naughty lot weren’t they?!

      • Yes they were naughty and perhaps ‘bored’ as you said, nothing but farmland around, dotted with the occasional public house, nothing much has changed in human behaviour it seems….

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